US court orders forfeiture of 279 crypto accounts tied to North Korea laundering | NK News

A U.S. court has ordered the forfeiture of nearly 300 cryptocurrency accounts linked to North Korea’s laundering of millions of dollars in stolen assets, underscoring Washington’s increasing efforts to crack down on illicit cyber activities funding Pyongyang’s nuclear ambitions.

Justice Timothy Kelly of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled on Wednesday that 279 virtual currency accounts must be forfeited to the U.S. government, citing their links to North Korea’s prolific cryptocurrency thefts, but court documents did not indicate a specific monetary amount that would be handed over.

A U.S. court has ordered the forfeiture of nearly 300 cryptocurrency accounts linked to North Korea’s laundering of millions of dollars in stolen assets, underscoring Washington’s increasing efforts to crack down on illicit cyber activities funding Pyongyang’s nuclear ambitions.

Justice Timothy Kelly of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled on Wednesday that 279 virtual currency accounts must be forfeited to the U.S. government, citing their links to North Korea’s prolific cryptocurrency thefts, but court documents did not indicate a specific monetary amount that would be handed over.

© Korea Risk Group. All rights reserved.
No part of this content may be reproduced, distributed, or used for
commercial purposes without prior written permission from Korea Risk Group.

Please check your inbox, for an email we just sent you, and click on the confirmation message in it to get subscribed to our Daily News Update.

Shreyas Reddy is a correspondent at NK News, based in Seoul. He previously worked as a researcher at BBC Monitoring, where his work focused on news and key people and organizations from the Korean Peninsula, Japan, Southeast Asia and the Pacific. Follow him on Twitter.

Internet Explorer is not compatible with this website. We instead recommend using Chrome, Edge, Firefox or Safari.

In addition, Microsoft cyber-security chief Chris Jackson has been urging users to stop using the browser since February 2019.

Join the influential community of members who rely on NK News original news and in-depth reporting

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google
Privacy Policy and
Terms of Service apply.

Join the influential community of members who rely on NK News original news and in-depth reporting

Join the influential community of members who rely on NK News original news and in-depth reporting

Please enter your username or email address. You will receive a link to create a new password via email.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google
Privacy Policy and
Terms of Service apply.